Tag Archives: First World War

Women, War and Peace: a West Midlands perspective

The 3rd Chris Upton Memorial Lecture, 12th November 2018

The Speaker is Maggie Andrews, Professor of Cultural History, University of Worcester

The Nell Haynes children, 1917

November 2018 marks the centenary of First World War armistice, which brought to an end four years of conflict and the century of the start of the very first parliamentary election campaign in which at least some women participated as voters and candidates.

In this year’s lecture, inspired by Chris Upton’s commitment to explore the lives of the ordinary people of the West Midlands, Professor Maggie Andrews will look at how the four years of war and the peace that followed affected the women in the region. Life on the home front offered some women new working opportunities or public roles and the new women voters created much excitement on polling day in December 1918.

Worcester munitions workers

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Birmingham Heritage Week 2018

It’s not long now until Birmingham Heritage Week 2018, and we’ve got a wide variety of things going on here at the Library of Birmingham!

8th September

PICTURE BIRMINGHAM

Saturday 8th September 2018, 11:15am-4:15pm

Venue: Heritage Learning Space, Level 4, Library of Birmingham

Booking: Pre-booking essential! To book, click here.   

Birmingham is an ever-changing city, and its changing nature has been documented through Archives in various formats for centuries, a relatively recent format being photography!

This family-friendly workshop is about capturing the city, photographically, on one day (Saturday 8th September 2018) as seen by you.

After a brief introduction by Michael Hallett, an explanation of the activity, and guidance on how to make the most of using your mobile device (mobile phone or tablet – no “proper” cameras!), and a walk around the Gallery where a photography exhibition will be on display, you will be sent out into the city to take photographs that, for you, represent the city or a moment in the city.

You will then return to the Library of Birmingham where we will look at your photos on a screen with all the other people attending to discuss them (so you absolutely must bring the cable you have for your device so that we can connect it to our hardware and download them!). Of the photographs submitted, a selection will be exhibited at the Library of Birmingham in late 2018/early 2019, and deposited in the City’s Archives for permanent preservation.

A Dancer’s Tale

Saturday 8th September 2018, 11:30am-1:00pm

Venue: Library of Birmingham

Booking: Pre-booking essential!  To book, contact Library of Birmingham on 0121 242 4242 or email childrens.library@birmingham.gov.uk

Inspired by Birmingham’s theatrical heritage and the ‘Year of Movement’, we will be offering a creative writing workshop for children aged 12-17. We will be using movement, music and images to spark your imagination and help you to create your dancer’s tale.

14th September

Creative Writing using First World War Archives with Fiona Joseph

Friday 14th September, 11:15am-4:00pm

Venue: Wolfson Centre for Archival Research, Level 4, Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad Street, Birmingham, B1 2ND

Booking: Pre-booking essential! To book, click here

Join Birmingham historical novelist and biographer, Fiona Joseph, for a hands-on Creative Writing session around the theme of the First World War. Archive material at the Library of Birmingham has been specially selected by Fiona Joseph in conjunction with Corinna Rayner, Archives & Collections Manager. This writing workshop will give a unique opportunity to explore some of the many archival treasures themed around Women at War (Home Front, Industry) and Conscience at War (Quakers, patriotism and pacifism). You will be able to browse items such as family letters, photographs, posters, postcards, news items and memorabilia from the period and use these as a springboard for your own creative response. Writers at ANY level, including beginners, are welcome. Just bring some writing equipment – pen and paper or laptop.

During the afternoon there will be an opportunity to read your work to the group for reaction and feedback. (Please note that this is strictly optional!) Fiona Joseph will be able to offer professional guidance on shaping and editing your writing. You will also be able to submit your piece for possible publication on the Library of Birmingham Archives & Collections blog.

15th September

Heritage Research Area Familiarisation session at Archives & Collections

Saturday 15th September, 11am-1:00pm.

Venue: Heritage Research Area, Level 4, Library of Birmingham, Centenary Square, Broad Street, Birmingham, B1 2ND

Booking: Pre-booking essential! To book, click here.

Meet staff at this event which will act as a beginners’ guide to resources such as maps, parish registers along with digital resources on Ancestry Institution and software for reading local newspapers.

Spaces are limited to 12 people per session and booking is essential.

There is so much going in Birmingham Heritage Week this year! Find out more by going to the Birmingham Heritage Week website.

100th Anniversary of the RAF

Royal Air Force Birmingham wireless telegrapher appeal, a recruitment appeal for ‘Young Men, 17 1/2 years and upwards’(MS 2966/3/1).

The 1st of April 2018 marks the 100th Anniversary of the Royal Air Force (RAF), when the Royal Naval Air Service and the Royal Flying Corps merged to become the first independent airforce in the world, following the passing of the Air Force (Constitution Act) 1917.  In this week’s blog post, I thought I’d take a look at some of the varied sources we hold here in Archives & Collections at the Library of Birmingham, relating to the RAF.

To start with, some of the earliest material I found comes from a collection called ‘Circulars relating to recruitment, fund raising and coal rationing from the First World War, 1917-1919’ (MS2966).  These circulars were sent from various sources to the Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham for the purpose of supporting the war effort.  It is likely that they were displayed in a number of Birmingham’s Catholic churches. You can see some examples of these in the image at the top of this blog post and below.

Birmingham Royal Air Force recruitment appeal to the men of Birmingham to keep up the bombing campaign against Germany by volunteering at the RAF Reception Depot, Paradise Street, 1918 (MS 2966/3/2)

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Belgian Refugees 1914 – 1918

Archives & Collections was recently contacted by Amsab-ISG, the Institute of Social History at the University of Ghent. We were reminded of a project they did which took place a couple of years ago to document the experiences of Belgian refugees that came to the UK during the First World War. In support of the project, Archives & Collections assisted their researchers in accessing the records of MS 652, the War Refugees Fund (Birmingham and District). Although only a small collection, it does include a Belgian Refugee Register 1914 – 1918. This volume lists the name, age and occupation of the refugees, the place they were sent to and the town of origin.

Belgian Refugee Register 1914 – 1918
[MS 652/6]

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In Remembrance

Daily Mail Wednesday November 7th 1917

This week saw the 100th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Passchendaele, the Third Battle of Ypres.

Also known as the ‘battle of mud’, over three months, there had been 325,000 Allied and 260,000 German casualties ‘to do little more than make the bump of the Ypres salient somewhat larger’.

As with many battles on the Western Front in the First World War, the decision to not withdraw was controversial. Victory was claimed after British and Canadian forces took control of the village of Passchendaele, only 5 miles from where the offensive had started.

We will remember them.

The War Poetry Collection in the Library of Birmingham

Book Plate from the Catalogue of the War Poetry Collection. 1921. L52.31.

 

The War Poetry Collection was presented to the Birmingham Reference Library in 1921 by an anonymous donor, in memory of William John Billington, 2/24 London Regiment, (Queen’s Hussars), 60th Division, formerly 2/2 South Midlands Field Ambulance, who was killed in action at Abu Tellul Ridge in Palestine  on 9 March 1918.

 

 

The donor was William Cross of Rubery, who had assembled an unrivalled collection of 1,233 books and pamphlets of poetry relating to the First World War, written by both soldiers and civilians.

Included are poems in English, Breton, Czech, Danish, French, Gaelic, German (Swiss), Italian, and Latin, by members of the British and Allied Nations. There is poetry which was published in Britain, Canada, Australia, America and Barbados.

Many additions were made to the Collection by the Reference Library, notably in 1938 when a fine collection of over 40 volumes of newscuttings of poetry and verse from newspapers and periodicals of the 1914-1918 period was acquired, which represents many different social attitudes to war from the patriotic to the despairing.

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Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler’s Photographs of Germany in the Great War

Käthe Buchler, self-portrait, c. 1905

Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler’s Photographs of Germany in the Great War

20 October 2017 – 14 January 2018

Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery

University of Birmingham

 

The Voices of War & Peace WW1 Engagement Centre is currently organising an exhibition of photographs by German amateur photographer Käthe Buchler (1876-1930), whose work forms one of the featured collections of the Museum of Photography in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony. This is the first time that her work has been displayed outside Germany.

Käthe Buchler, ‘Nurse with patient and Christmas tree in the military hospital’, 1914-1918

Buchler photographed the German home front during the First World War. Her black & white images depict her family and community, children contributing to the war effort, women working in traditionally male roles, wounded soldiers returning from the frontline and the nursing staff who treated them. There will be two exhibitions in Birmingham, at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, focusing on Buchler’s images of women and children, and at the University of Birmingham, where her photographs of injured soldiers will be displayed alongside material relating to the University’s role as a hospital during the War. Both exhibitions draw extensively on the collections of the Library of Birmingham.

Käthe Buchler, Children from the A.V.G. (waste recycling company) with Pickelhaube (spiked helmet) in front of a puppet theatre on Hindenburg’s birthday, c. 1915

Käthe Buchler

Käthe Buchler was born in Braunschweig, Germany, in 1876. At age 19 she married Walther Buchler and by 1901 the couple had moved to an affluent area of the town. In 1905 they set up a foundation which awarded local grants in arts and culture. As well as supporting the arts, Käthe also belonged to many women’s organisations and to the Red Cross. In 1901 she had turned her attention to photography and Walther gave Käthe her first camera, a binocular Voigtländer. While she successfully taught herself to use the camera, she also sought advice from local professionals and attended courses in Berlin that were open to female students. She later developed and produced her own prints in the attic of the Buchler home.

Käthe Buchler died in 1930, aged 54. In 2003 the Buchler family donated their collection of over 1,000 black and white prints and 175 colour autochrome plates to the Museum of Photography in Braunschweig. Continue reading