Tag Archives: National Vegetarian Week

National Vegetarian Week 15th – 21st May 2017

As it is National Vegetarian Week, I’ve ‘tucked into’ our collections and uncovered some recipes to present you with a delicious veggie friendly menu.

I’m going to put the chive in archives! (I’ll never make it as a comedian.)

For starters (adopts her best waitress voice) we have some mushroom patties. Dear diners, these are seasoned with a little salt and pepper and are served over some beautifully crusty pastry.  No soggy bottoms here.

Mushroom Patties

This recipe is taken from one of a number of cookery books collected by an Emily S. Thomas and Miss Walker. [MS 4082 (Acc 2011/149)]  It comes in particular from The Home Mission Book of Recipes, Vol II, 1909. I like that the recipe is clearly marked up as vegetarian, and the patties sure seem tasty, although, I am unsure about the teaspoon of sugar. Perhaps it’s that old balance of sweetness to salt which will make these savoury delights zing!

Onto mains (readopting her waitressing voice) *coughs* your entrée; I couldn’t resist a nice ‘dole or dholl’ curry. (I tend to spell it dal.) This one originates from a recipe and knitting pattern book collected/written by an unknown person, dated as 19C in our catalogue. [MS 1158/1]

Dole curry

The volume has a number of enclosures and this particular recipe is included in a section based around curries. It also gives instructions on how to boil rice, and, as the below shows, make pillaw [pilaf?] rice – the perfect accompaniments.

Perfect rice

For afters, I’ve chosen something that looks simple enough to bake (no electronic mixing bowls here!) and that would be equally as nice the day after with a cup of tea. The recipe comes from another orphaned book (but one with a fine inscription: ‘Nora with Love from Both, 12 Willow Avenue, Christmas 1937′.) [MS 1170] Anyone have room for a slice of tasty date and walnut cake? Continue reading

Vegetarian Roots

Inspired by National Vegetarian Week in May, we wanted to introduce readers to the Pitman Vegetarian Restaurant and Hotel which was located on Corporation Street, Birmingham, and opened in the late 19th century. Unusually for the city, the building has not been demolished and its fine frieze of diners above the ground floor, designed by Benjamin Creswick, can still be admired.

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Pitman Buildings. Home to the 19th century vegetarian restaurant. (C) Fiona Tait

The Hotel was opened in 1898 as an expansion of the vegetarian restaurant on the same site, which had opened in 1896. The building was named after Sir Isaac Pitman (of ‘shorthand’ fame), who was at that time vice-president of the Vegetarian Society.The proprietor of both restaurant and hotel was James Henry Cook.

Continue reading