Tag Archives: Passchendaele

In Remembrance

Daily Mail Wednesday November 7th 1917

This week saw the 100th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Passchendaele, the Third Battle of Ypres.

Also known as the ‘battle of mud’, over three months, there had been 325,000 Allied and 260,000 German casualties ‘to do little more than make the bump of the Ypres salient somewhat larger’.

As with many battles on the Western Front in the First World War, the decision to not withdraw was controversial. Victory was claimed after British and Canadian forces took control of the village of Passchendaele, only 5 miles from where the offensive had started.

We will remember them.

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Passchendaele

Birmingham Post 31 July 1917

Today marks 100 years since the start of the Battle of Passchendaele, the Third Battle of Ypres. 

Reporting on the night before the Battle, the Birmingham Post Military Correspondent wrote ‘I cannot help thinking we have not seen the culmination of our effort, which, by the way, is not confined to Flanders.’ Despite the press noticing the increasing intensity of firing on the Western Front, it is doubtful that they could or would have predicted what lay ahead in a battle that ‘became infamous not only for the scale of casualties, but also for the mud.’